News


Update of the Map of Irish Wetlands 2018

MIWJan2018PR

As part of the joint project to map Ireland's wetlands, with Foss Environmental Consulting, a revised Map of Irish Wetlands for the entire country has just been uploaded to the Google map platform. A variety of new data sources, site descriptions and photographic images for the wetlands shown has been included in the 2018 revised map. 

The location of 12,731 wetland sites are shown on the Map of Irish Wetlands, together with information on known and potential wetland habitats on these sites. 

4,065 wetland sites are now illustrated with site photographs.

3,753 wetland sites include a summary description based on surveys and reports.

Further background information on the Map of Irish Wetlands project can be found here

During 2018 we hope to further refine and expand the information on wetlands displayed on the Map of Irish Wetlands, and welcome your information and photographs for the wetlands shown on the map.  

Counties Longford & Roscommon Wetland Study 2017

The results of the Counties Longford & Roscommon Wetland Study 2017 have been published. The survey was commissioned by Longford and Roscommon County Councils and undertaken by ecologists from Wetland Surveys Ireland and Foss Environmental Consulting. The survey aimed to identify all wetland areas in the two counties to better inform land use planning and sustainable development strategies.

Wetlands can be defined as areas of land that are wet enough for long enough to support a variety of plants and animals that are specially adapted to wet conditions. These wetland areas in Longford and Roscommon include a range of wildlife habitats such as raised and cutover bogs, marshes, swamps, turloughs, wet woodlands, lakes and ponds.

By carrying out a review of digital maps and previous studies, and undertaking an aerial photographic and subsoil analysis of the two counties the Counties Longford & Roscommon Wetland Study identified thirty two wetland habitat types occurring in 676 individual sites in Roscommon and 281 sites in Longford. As part of the study of the two counties, information on these wetlands has been collated into wetland map dataset.

Preliminary site boundaries have been mapped for wetland sites identified during the study, providing an estimate of the extent of wetlands within these counties. The area of wetland sites mapped in Longford covered an area of 203 km2 (18.6% of land area) while wetland sites in Roscommon covered an area of 580 km2 (21.9% of land area).

The report highlights the absence of detailed information on many sites and the urgent need for targeted field surveys to gain a better understanding of the wetland resource within the county and to ensure that those sites of highest importance are protected.

The Counties Longford & Roscommon Wetland Study 2017 is an action of the County Longford & Roscommon Heritage and Biodiversity Plans. The reports is available from the Heritage Office in Longford and Roscommon County Councils.    

ArcGIS Helps Irish Surveyor Monitor Europe’s Last Remaining Peatlands

Wetland Surveys Ireland work was featured in the ESRI News for Water newsletter in the autumn 2017 issue, with an article on high accuracy (sub-metre) recording of spatial data on Irish raised bogs. 

Esri News for Water Fall 2017

You can read the full article here: http://www.esri.com/library/newsletters/water/fall-2017.pdf

Ireland’s Fabulous Fens

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At Wetland Surveys Ireland and Foss Environmental Consulting we have been surveying, studying and researching fen habitats throughout Ireland for over twenty years. We have recently developed a story map to share some of our fascination with these wonderful Irish wetlands. The map is a compilation of stunning images taken from Irish fens giving you an insight into this lesser known and rarely seen part of the Irish landscape.

Fens are a unique type of peatland that form an important part of the Irish landscape. They help regulate and clean our water supply, support a rich variety of wild plants and animals, and can even tell us about our past history. With so much in their favour, it is surprising that fens are one of the least studied and lesser known Irish habitats.

The story map brings you on an informative tour focusing on four main themes;

·      Background to fen habitats where you can learn of their origin, development, and ecology

·      Biodiversity value of fens and the various plant and animal species they support

·      The importance of conserving Irish Fens

·      Fen sites to visit in your locality many of which are open to the public with various facilities

Ireland’s Fabulous Fens story map was created by Dr Peter Foss as part of the Map of Irish Wetlands project. To learn more about Irish fens and see the spectacular images click on the following link:

http://bit.ly/IrishFens


Footnote:

Distribution map of fens in Ireland based on data help in the Map of Irish Wetlands.

All 1670 Irish Fens csml

 

Additional information on the abundance of the different known and potential fen types in Ireland based on data help within the Map of Irish Wetlands.

Fen type & Number of known and potential sites identified in the Map of Irish Wetlands:

  • Alkaline fen  659
  • Cladium fen  196
  • Transition Mire  541
  • Poor Fen  643
  • Calcareous springs  222
  • Non-Calcareous springs  45


(Note: a fen site can contain more than one fen type)

Information for the wetlands included in the story map comes from information held in the Map of Irish Wetlands. The Map of Irish Wetlands has been created by Dr Peter Foss and Dr Patrick Crushell and shows the location of more than 12,600 wetland sites in Ireland. The map has been developed and made available to the public free of charge.

If you would like to visit some other wetland you can check out the story map Wetlands to Visit Around Ireland. The story map brings you on an informative tour of 40 wetlands around Ireland where you can learn more about these fascinating habitats.

Link to 'Wetlands to Visit Around Ireland' story map:

http://arcg.is/2kWtYY8

Discover Ramsar Wetlands in the Republic of Ireland


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The story map brings you on an informative tour of 45 designated Ramsar sites in the Republic of Ireland. The Ramsar Convention entered into force in Ireland on 15 March 1985. Since then Ireland has designated 45 sites as Wetlands of International Importance (Ramsar Sites), with a surface area of 66,994 hectares. This intergovernmental treaty embodies the commitments of its member countries to maintain the ecological character of their Wetlands of International Importance and to plan for the “wise use”, or sustainable use, of all of the wetlands in their territories.

This information tour of the designated Ramsar sites around Ireland includes map location information, a brief summary of species and habitats of interest that resulted in the Ramsar designation, and information on whether sites are open to visitors.

The Ramsar Wetlands in the Republic of Ireland story map was created by Dr Peter Foss and Dr Patrick Crushell from information on these wetlands included in the Map of Irish Wetlands, which shows the location of more than 12,600 wetland sites in Ireland. The map and the latest story map have been developed and made available to the public free of charge without the assistance of any public funding.

According to Dr.  Foss “The Irish Ramsar sites represent some of the finest wetland in the country and a spectrum of the different wetland types that occur in Ireland. They are indispensable for the countless benefits or “ecosystem services” that they provide humanity, ranging from freshwater supply, food and building materials, biodiversity, flood control, groundwater recharge, and climate change mitigation.”

So if you would like to learn more about Ireland’s Ramsar wetlands, all you have to do to access the story map is go to the link shown below:

http://arcg.is/2tPjHAB

Footnote:

Information for the story map comes from information held in the Map of Irish Wetlands. The Map of Irish Wetlands has been created by Dr Peter Foss and Dr Patrick Crushell and shows the location of more than 12,600 wetland sites in Ireland. The map has been developed and made available to the public free of charge.

If you would like to visit some other wetland you can check out the story map Wetlands to Visit Around Ireland. The story map brings you on an informative tour of 40 wetlands around Ireland where you can learn more about these fascinating habitats.

Links to ‘Wetlands to Visit Around Ireland' story map:

http://arcg.is/2kWtYY8

For further Information or story maps about wildlife heritage sites, check out the websites below:

WetlandSurveysIreland.com; Tel: 064 6642524; E: info@wetlandSurveysIreland.com

Links to Map of Irish Wetlands:  WetlandSurveysIreland.com or FossEnvironmentalConsulting.com   

Join us for the Reenagross Woodland Park Tour Heritage Day Event

Reenagross Tour Web Image Sml


  • 19 August, 11am - 1pm
  • Dr. Patrick Crushell
  • Reenagross Woodland Park, Kenmare
  • Co. Kerry

 

A new online interactive map of Reenagross Woodland Park has been produced by Wetland Surveys Ireland to enhance visitor experience at the park. We will demonstrate use of the map which includes a range of visitor information on the natural heritage at Reenagross and conservation work that is being undertaken to manage the park.


The new online interactive map of Reenagross Woodland Park has been produced for Kenmare Tidy Towns with support from the Heritage Council.

The story map provides information on habitats, flora, fauna, and management and aims to enhance visitor experience. We will demonstrate the use of the map during the walk and also see how many plant and animal species we can identify on the way.

Please bring your smart phone or tablet along so you can follow the tour.


Admission & Booking


  • Admission Free
  • Suitable for Children under 12
  • Wheelchair Access (Partial)
  • Car Parking Available
  • Further Information

 

Mobile: 086 8510292

Email: patrick@WetlandSurveysIreland.com

Link to the story map:

http://arcg.is/2mOk9ZL

Take the Reenagross Woodland Park Tour

Would you like to visit and learn more about Reenagross Woodland Park, Kenmare? The new story map produced by Wetland Surveys Ireland and Foss Environmental Consulting brings you on an informative tour of the park where you can learn more about the fascinating estuarine and woodland habitats and wildlife that you can see there.

Reenagross Tour Web Image Sml


The park is a wooded peninsula set within the beautiful landscape of Kenmare Bay, Co. Kerry. The Reenagross Woodland Park has over 3km of walking trails, along with a diverse range of habitats that are home to a wide variety of plants and animals and places of interest. The park is actively managed by Kenmare Tidy Towns as a place where people can enjoy nature, take a walk, and learn about the rich wildlife of the area. Kenmare Tidy Towns have undertaken numerous projects to enhance the value of the woodland for wildlife and to manage the park for visitors. You will learn more about these topics during this tour.

The park has a variety of visitor facilities including paths, seating, information signs, that will help you enjoy a visit to this magical place, and learn more about the park, as well as the habitats, wildlife and management work being undertaken by Kenmare Tidy Towns to enhance the biodiversity of this oak woodland.

The story map includes a map of the walking trails at Reenagross, location information on habitats of interest, a brief summary of what you can discover at the site, a summary of habitat and species protection work that has been undertaken, and a link to further information, opening times and much more.

According to Dr.  Crushell “Kenmare Tidy Towns manage this wonderful place, and have invested significant resources and voluntary effort in making the site open to the public and allowing anyone to learn more about this fascinating place and its wildlife and biodiversity”.

Kenmare Tidy Towns wish to thanks The Heritage Council for funding to develop this story map.

So if you would like to learn more about Reenagross Woodland Park, all you have to do to access the story map is go to the link shown below:

http://arcg.is/2mOk9ZL

ReenagrossStoryMap Image


Footnote:

Information for the Reenagross Woodland story map comes from information held in the Map of Irish Wetlands. The Map of Irish Wetlands has been created by Dr Peter Foss and Dr Patrick Crushell and shows the location of more than 12,600 wetland sites in Ireland. The map has been developed and made available to the public free of charge.

If you would like to visit some other wetland you can check out the story map Wetlands to Visit Around Ireland. The story map brings you on an informative tour of 40 wetlands around Ireland where you can learn more about these fascinating habitats.

Link to 'Wetlands to Visit Around Ireland' story map:

http://arcg.is/2kWtYY8

For further Information or story maps about wildlife heritage sites, check out the websites below:

WetlandSurveysIreland.com; Tel: 064 6642524; E: info@wetlandSurveysIreland.com

Links to Map of Irish Wetlands:  WetlandSurveysIreland.com or FossEnvironmentalConsulting.com    

Mires and Peatlands of Europe - Status, distribution and conservation

IMCGBOOK

The International Mire Conservation Group (IMCG) has just published a new book - which provides for the first time - a comprehensive and up-to-date overview of the mires and peatlands in biogeographic Europe. 

Written by 134 authors, including the Republic of Ireland contribution by Peter Foss and Catherine O’Connell of the IPCC, the book describes mire and peatland types, extent, distribution, use, conservation and restoration individually for each country and integrated for the entire continent. Complemented by a multitude of maps and photographs, the book offers and impressive and colourful journey full of inspiring historical context and fascinating details. 

Details:

Mires and peatlands of Europe. Status, distribution and conservation. Edited by Hans Joosten, Franziska Tanneberger & Asbjørn Moen. With contributions of 134 authors. 781 pages, 205 figures, 218 tables, 112 colour photos, 21x28cm, c. 2.5 kg, bound, English. Price: €94.00. 

Order your copies directly from the publisher: mail@schweizerbart.de or order on-line from their website

Publishers Synopsis:

This book provides the first comprehensive and up-to-date overview of mires and peatlands in biogeographic Europe. Authored by 134 mire specialists, the extensive volume describes mire and peatland types, terms, extent, distribution, use, conservation, and restoration, individually for each European country and in an integrated manner for the entire continent. 

The descriptions are complemented by a multitude of maps and photographs, the book offers an impressive and colourful journey, full of surprising historical context and fascinating details, while appreciating the core principles and unifying concepts of mire science.

The European continent features an impressive variety of mires and peatlands. Polygon, palsa, and aapa mires, concentric and eccentric bogs, spring and percolation fens, coastal marshes, blanket bogs, saline fens, acid, alkaline, nutrient poor, nutrient rich: the peatlands of Europe represent unique ecosystem biodiversity and harbour a large treasure of flora and fauna typical of peat forming environments.

Europe is also the continent with the longest history, the highest intensity, and the largest variety of peatland use, and as a consequence it has the highest proportion of degraded peatlands worldwide. Peatland science and technology developed in parallel to exploitation and it is therefore not surprising that almost all modern peatland terms and concepts originated and matured in Europe. 

Their massive degradation also kindled the desire to protect these beautiful landscapes, full of peculiar wildlife. In recent decades attention has widened to include additional vital ecosystem services that natural and restored peatlands provide. Already the first scientific book on peatlands (Schoockius 1658) contained a chapter on restoration. Yet, only now there is a rising awareness of the necessity to conserve and restore mires and peatlands in order to avoid adverse environmental and economic effects.

National Award for Glenasmole Valley story map


ESRI2017CompLogoThe recently produced Bohernabreena Reservoir and Glenasmole Valley - A wildlife and wilderness amenity close to Dublin City for you to explore - story map created by Peter Foss in conjunction with Wetland Surveys Ireland has received the runner up award from ESRI Ireland in its the national 2017 Maps Make Sense Competition. The prize is a free trip to the GIS Esri UK Conference in London, on May 16th

This Story Map is littered with striking images and useful local information about the area presented through the medium of a Cascade Story Map. Peter has a long association and fascination in this location and its wildlife which he has visited for over 30 years. The reservoir lakes occurs on the outskirts of Dublin at the foot of the Wicklow Mountains. 


“A picture tells a thousand words and this entry makes very effective use of beautiful photographs to entice the user into exploring a little-known area. The photographs lead the user to the interactive map and allow them to put spatial context on the photographic material as well, of course, as being a practical tool to help when they visit the area.” Eamonn Doyle, Esri Ireland.

The tour provides information on places of interest within the valley, its wildlife and the wetland and terrestrial habitats that occur there. The map aim of the project is to allow visitors to appreciate and learn about the unique value of the wildlife and habitats of this designated EU Special Area of Conservation and make use of its visitor and amenity facilities. The map is based on information held in the Map of Irish Wetlands.

Footnote:

The Bohernabreena Reservoir and Glenasmole Valley story map can be viewed on your smartphone, tablet or pc.

Bohernabreena Reservoir and Glenasmole Valley story map link: http://arcg.is/2oxurSK

Further information on the Maps Make Sense 2017 competition can be found in the ESRI website at - http://bit.ly/2pfztUW

New staff member at WSI

Wetland Surveys Ireland is delighted to welcome a new member of staff to our team, Dr. Mary Catherine Gallagher. 

MaryCatherine

Mary Catherine graduated with an honours degree (BSc) in Zoology from UCC in 2011. Following that, she worked in the education centre in Fota Wildlife Park, where she was responsible for giving talks and tours to the public and school groups as well as assisting with field ecology courses for second level students. 

Mary Catherine undertook a masters degree (MSc) in marine biology in UCC. This involved a 6-month research project which was focused on the ecology of an invasive algae species. This research developed her interest in the area of invasive species ecology, which led to Mary Catherine carrying out her doctorate (PhD) on an invasive barnacle species from 2013-2016. Mary Catherine has also worked as a marine biology tutor for primary school children and as a marine ecology walks leader on blue flag beaches.

Since joining Wetland Surveys Ireland Mary Catherine has been gaining a range of experience in habitat surveys and mapping, Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and report compilation.

 © Website design Peter Foss 2012